Ceremonials of Common Days is Reprinted!

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The new and the old

 

This collection of the Ceremonials of a Year is an Anthology of the Wonder of Common Days. The Ceremonials of a year are accumulative; they can never be concluded, as long as one lives on earth. A Ceremonial may be interpreted as a spiritual obeisance to the created beauty of the world. From the Forward

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A few months ago I was contacted by a woman named Michele Lamond who wanted to reprint Abbie Graham’s Ceremonials of Common Days. Originally published in 1923 it was due to come into the public domain and she wanted to use a quote from one of my posts on the back of the reprinted edition. I was only too happy to give permission and was thrilled that this beloved book would now be widely available.

Having just received the new edition I am happy with the more modern format and engaging graphics.

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The book celebrates simple loves of daily life as the seasons turn: lighting the first fire of winter; celebrating ink and letter-writing as a means of “conquering distances;” the Coffee Ceremonial that acknowledges this “gregarious beverage” which Graham observes in the morning that follows the first night of camping; and the Ceremonial of the Roads–in praise of rambling–in which Graham quotes Thoreau; and many more ways of honoring ordinary life. There is a page at the end of each season for readers to create their own ceremonials.

On Thanksgiving Day I celebrate the Ceremonial of Being Glad for People. A year is a lean year or a year of plenty in proportion to the poverty or richness of its fellowships….Thanksgiving is an articulate season, a time for expressing the unspoken things of the heart. The Ceremonial of Being Glad for People was the initial ceremonial. Because of it, the other ceremonials were made necessary. From Autumn

Revealing a kind of quiet bygone age of simple observation, generosity to others and a slower pace of life, yet Graham calls for being fully engaged in a world where the mundane is not taken for granted, but celebrated in grand style.

The holidays are coming and I say, “Celebrate the Ceremonial of the Stocking Stuffer!”

Available from:
Michele Lamond, Proprietor
NelliesNotecards.com
Venice, Florida

Happy Thanksgiving to Friends everywhere…

 

 

 

 

Thank You!

I am extremely thankful for this year of book blogging, not only for the wonderful books I have read, but for all the book bloggers and others who have taken the time to ‘like’ or comment on my blog. Thank you very much.

I have loved the discussions and conversations, the wonderful posts you write about the books you’ve read forcing my tbr pile to grow and grow! The challenges and readalongs have been fun as well as enlightening.

I wish you all a wonderful day, however you celebrate (or not).

It’s a beautiful day in Southern California and I am about to hit the road to spend the day in San Diego, a city I love, with the people I love, in scenery I love love love!

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Happy Thanksgiving from South Fortuna!

 

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from Laurie “I love crows” Welch 🙂

“Thanksgiving” from Ceremonials of Common Days, by Abbie Graham (1923)

My Edition:
Title: Ceremonials of Common DaysIMG_3410
Author: Abbie Graham
Publisher: The Womans Press
Year: 1923
Pages: 97

 

On Thanksgiving Day I celebrate the Ceremonial of Being Glad for People. I could be grateful on this day for bountiful harvests and national benefits; but I have other days for those ceremonials because one heart is not spacious enough to hold the full measure of all gratitude. A year is a lean year or a year of plenty in proportion to the poverty or richness of its fellowships.

I would give my thanks for the people whom I have but glimpsed in passing: children watching at windows; those who sell flowers, especially little boys who trust me to buy their violets or dogwood branches; porters on trains and in hotels; post office employees who make letters possible; people in trains; nurses in hospitals; makers of music; those who sit in church with me, whom I “silently rejoice to be with.”

There is gratitude for the people whom I pass each morning and evening: children on bicycles; those who go and come from work; and for the people whom it is not given to me to see,–for those whom I know only through the printed page, for those who have designed certain buildings and parks and monuments, who have constructed roads, for those who sit in offices and plan for the well-being of the world, for the people around the world who work that I may have the necessities of life.

And there are other people who bring to me joyous delight on this day. To them I write letters—to the old friends and the new. For Thanksgiving is an articulate season, a time for expressing the unspoken things of the heart.

The Ceremonial of Being Glad for People was the initial ceremonial. Because of it, the other ceremonials were made necessary.[i]

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Abbie Graham (1889-1972) was a writer of nonfiction on many topics including spirituality, race relations, travel and most notably on the women’s suffrage movement in the United States. This is a little book of beautifully simple celebrations of life. Arranged by seasons it gives tips that the reader can use to plan her own personal special days.

Happy Thanksgiving to all! May we remember and be grateful for those precious in our hearts and may we reach out to those we do not know.

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[i] 91-93.