September in Review

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Just a brief mention of August, because I really enjoyed Austen in August put on by Roof Beam Reader. I made a doable plan for reading and watching some film adaptations and actually completed it. The highlights for me were reading Northanger Abbey and Mansfield Park, both for the first time and watching a film adaptation of Persuasion. I also watched for probably the 4th time, since I own it, the Emma Thompson adaptation of Sense and Sensibility, which I love. I read a lot of blog posts from the many Austen in August participants adding more books to my Austen tbr.

Reviews

cardcatalogLibrary of Congress, The Card Catalog: Books, Cards and Literary Treasures (nonfiction)
Before library catalogs were online there was the card catalog. The publishing office of the LOC showcases some of their holdings with the actual card catalog and the bits of librarian notes that don’t show up in the Internet sources.

GECrucibleMrs. George Sheldon Downs, Gertrude Elliot’s Crucible (fiction)
I thoroughly enjoyed this book and discovering the ‘dime novel.’

 

 

EmilyL.M. Montgomery, The Emily Novels (fiction)
Some of the nature and fantasy elements of this lesser known series by Montgomery.


Creative Activities

#Blogging the Spirit
For this month’s post I shared about practicing Reiki.

King Arthur’s Round Table – I am writing a guest post for WitchWeek that Lory from Emerald City Book Review hosts each year. This year the theme is Dreams of Arthur, and the Round Table has proven a provocative subject!


Other Books Read

oncetimeOnce Upon a Time in the North, by Philip Pullman, 2008
I was alerted to this book by Chris of Calmgrove. If you are familiar with Philip Pullman’s His Dark Materials you will remember Lee Scoresby the aeronaut and the great armored bear Iorek Byrnison (one of my favorite characters). This is the back story of how they met and how they bonded together against a common enemy.

feverFever 1793, Laurie Halse Anderson, 2000
During the spring of 1793, Philadelphia was hit with a devastating yellow fever epidemic. The book centers on 13 year-old Matilda Cook and her family who own a coffee house in the city. The historical outbreak killed five thousand people turning Philadelphia, at that time the nation’s capital, into a ghost town as those who could fled to the countryside.

larringtonnorseThe Norse Myths: A Guide to the Gods and Heroes, Carolyne Larrington, 2017
The telling of the myths and legends from the old Norse sources, history, archaeology, literature. I saw this in the library and had to check it out after just having read Neil Gaiman’s Norse Mythology. This book is for the more historically, primary-source minded, but it is not dry or academic.

naturprinThe Nature Principal, Richard Louv, 2011
Modern men and women, attached as we are to our technology, have forgotten that we need to move, to get outside, that is the real world. “unplug, boot it down, get off line, get outdoors, breathe again, become real in a real world.”


beingdogBeing a Dog: Following the Dog into a World of Smell
, Alexandra Horowitz, 2016
This was such a fun book. Not just about dogs and their incredible nose, but ours, too. And why some humans have better smellers than others, like perfumers and sommeliers.

Looking forward to October

R.I.P. XII
WitchWeek
Blogging the Spirit
Dewey’s 24-hour Readathon

Personal

August and September held some difficult moments for me. As you know, my dad died in April, but his celebration of life was delayed until August 5th. I now understand why that kind of marker is important as it left my mother, sister and myself without a formal closure. But the reason for the delay was a happy one. My dad volunteered at a local animal shelter for many years and upon his passing they decided to name the dog building after him and they needed time to plan the ceremony and commission a plaque. But it was worth the wait. How lucky am I that my dad’s life lives on for such a good cause?

September has been a health-challenging month as it brought me two more skin cancer procedures for basal cell carcinoma, my 5th and 6th, so I have another scar on my forehead and a chunk taken out of my right ear. Both are healing nicely, but kept me from many of the physical activities I enjoy. It is hard sitting still for so many weeks. But there is more to come when my face goes through a procedure called photodynamic light therapy next month. Trying to find some humor in all of this, I noticed from the pictures I have seen, it will make me look like some undead creature for a few weeks, without special effects make up. Maybe I can make some extra money for Halloween!

Animal Reiki

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My Jess after a Reiki treatment. Dogs know bliss, too.

 

Reiki* is one of the elements of my spiritual life. I self-treat everyday and it’s something I want to pursue more deeply.  I love that I have this tool for myself and for all the two- and four-leggeds in my life.

Animals feel pain and pleasure just like people. When you can do something special for your animal pal that you know they love, do it!
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*Reiki (ray-kee) is a spiritual healing practice that balances, relaxes and activates our natural healing processes. I practice it as both a spiritual path and a hands-on healing modality.

 

#BloggingTheSpirit

How the Morning Pages Work for Me

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I have been doing the Morning Pages from Julia Cameron’s The Artist’s Way for many years. I am not a regular, but I go through spurts where I write every morning for many weeks. Recently, as the year was ending and a new one beginning, all that desire to let go of stagnation and the optimism of what to bring in found me at it again.

The style of writing for the Morning Pages is stream of consciousness and thoughts in the moment, as the object is words on the page, not a published-ready piece. The idea being what you put down on paper first thing in the morning will not haunt your thoughts for the rest of the day. And often, in an unconscious way, you will write your way out of whatever is bugging you. Since this often happens to me, I think it must be magic. I will actually move from Point A where I am absolutely stuck to Point B where I have the answer.

And every once in a while, I feel like I am getting guidance when I write; that the words being put down on paper are not my thoughts. This is especially obvious when I find the pronouns change from I/me to you. It is as if someone (me?) is trying to tell me something. It is an odd sensation to feel like the pen is moving at someone else’s prompt. But the words are always kind and encouraging pointing out what I’d forgotten about myself or giving me an idea I had not previously considered.

During these last few weeks I have been burning through the suggested three pages a day

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Mission San Juan Capistrano

into four or five and am on my second pen! But each day I shed something: sometimes it’s minor, like rearranging my bookshelves to make better sense or something kind of scary as in reevaluating a relationship. And I am also reminding myself to do more of the things I love: exploring historical sites and writing about them, getting back to baking, trail walking and my Reik practice, for example.

 

I think the Morning Pages work for me because I have been journaling for a very long time and I know when to turn off the logic/researcher part of my brain and allow the dreamer/fantasy side to take over. I need to remember the importance of this balance as I go through the year.

Hey, it is almost the middle of January, I’d better get crackin’!

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Not just a pile of sticks. I discovered a rat midden! Mission Trails, San Diego.