Remembering the Dead

abbiegraphm3

I have posted excerpts from Abbie Graham’s, Ceremonials of Common Days before.

This little book is almost a century old, and while not overtly religious is one of the most spiritually healing books I own. Graham is not well-known. I had never heard of her when I plucked this book on a whim at a library book sale. Without that happy chance, I am certain I’d go through my life never knowing her. This book that calms me, inspires me, provokes my creativity and gives me hope in the dark, I almost passed by.

At this time of the year, Halloween/All Saints/All Souls/Dia de los Muertos, when the recently dead and the ancestors call out for remembrance, Graham has this to say to me. I hope it is meaningful all around.

 

IMG_4960.JPG

 

When the kingdoms of the world have passed before me, I close my eyes that I may perceive that mightier kingdom, the kingdom of the spirit. I re-see people in terms of spiritual values.

I see people in human forms and all of the material creation as scaffolding for the spirit. When the human spirit is ready to be launched on the infinite seas, the scaffolding will be thrown aside and the spirit will slip out to sea, unencumbered, yet grateful it will be for the things of the earth that prepared it for its long voyage. All things will be hallowed that helped to shape it for that eternal launching.

Sacred, for me, will be the western prairies, the mountain streams, the lake paths, the sunrises seen above neighboring chimneys, the quiet walks along a village street, the gardens, the fragrance of old-fashioned flowers, the moonlight falling in my room, and rain at night with trees blowing.

How much these things and others shall have shaped my spirit, I shall not know, but of their daily fashioning I am aware. As my spirit, dominant and eternally adventurous, shall enter the vast seas, I shall not forget the sacramental service of the scaffolding of earth.

To all the newly departed, I say, “Bon Voyage!”

dia

 

WitchWeek 2017 & The Days of the Dead

dia

 

In many traditions at this time of the year it is believed the veil between the living and the dead is thin. I don’t think it is any coincidence that Halloween/Samhain, the Day of the Dead and All Saints’/All Souls’ Day occur within days of each other. Darkness has begun its descent over the land and that always brings up death. Christians probably took up the earlier concept of the Pagan commemoration of the dead and made it their own, but instead of seeing this as a competition, I see it as complementary.

knight1

I came to this conclusion as I worked on my guest post for WitchWeek, a week long celebration of fantasy books and authors hosted at the Emerald City Book Review. This year, the theme is Dreams of Arthur.  I finally understand the overlap of Paganism and Christianity that infuses King Arthur and Camelot: that King Arthur emerges from Celtic folklore, yet becomes very firmly placed in one of Christianity’s biggest mysteries, the Quest for the Holy Grail.

That the occupier appropriates the customs of the occupied is an important awareness, but it doesn’t mean we have to throw out the newer rites. During the last several generations the resurgence of Paganism, Witchcraft, modern Druidy and other non-Christian traditions continues to rise and practitioners reconstruct rites and ceremonies that, in my opinion, are a positive shift.

The last harvest is another theme we share. Just as in the old days people spent this time of the year gathering up the last of the harvest, bringing in the animals and making preparations for winter’s long period of indoor living, we do the same. This was made clear to me during the years I lived in Chicago when the changes of seasons—and the changes of activities—especially during winter, were in stark contrast to those of my native California!

crowmoonSo, as we begin to pull in both externally as well as internally we reap our modern harvest. And as we did of old we celebrate our ancestors and remember our more recent dead.

I wish everyone a Happy Halloween, Samhain Blessings, a meaningful Dia de los Muertos and Blessed All Saints’/All Souls’ days.

 

I am remembering my dad today, who died this year:

James Martin Welch
June 26, 1932-April 17, 2017

chicago.jepg (2)

 

 

Are you remembering anyone during this time?

 

********
Join Lory this week in celebrating King Arthur, his Knights and the Camelot community with posts, a giveaway, lively discussions and a readalong of Kazuo Ishiguro’s, The Buried Giant!

Rock People

I am back in San Diego, house sitting,  through next week. It is a regular menagerie around here with two dogs, three cats, a turtle, a spider and fish. Paging Dr. Doolittle!

One of my favorite hiking spots here is in Mission Trails Regional Park. Inside the visitor center is a sculpture called, Heritage. The first time I saw it I had come from walking the long road that divides the park. I’d noticed how the rocks and boulders faced each other across the peaks, with South Fortuna, the most prominent on this side of the park with its wide promontory of tall boulders, greeting visitors as they entered.

southfortuna

South Fortuna

In the sculpture, the faces and bodies of aged Native Americans are carved out of boulders. They are at once, FROM the boulders and ARE the boulders. And that is why the boulder outcropping of South Fortuna draws me: they aren’t just rocks, they are Rock People, the Ancestors of the Kumeyaay, the indigenous people of this land.

rockpeople

 

IMG_3853
It is easy to imagine in the tall, flat rocks and boulders the Old Ones of this region, looking out across their land to what was, looking for their people, missing the acknowledgement and reverence they were once given, their presence remembered and acknowledge as the inhabitants moved through their day.

What do they watch for now, these sentries, guarding their ancestral home? I hope, from their tall perch, they see other people enjoying and benefiting from this beautiful open space, and happy their sacred land is appreciated.

 

sfortuna.jpeg

Climbing the Ancestors

Hawks and crows use their ‘heads’ as perches, smaller birds and animals use their nooks and crannies as living spaces. Some humans climb them or walk on them. Do the ancestors mind? Is it desecration to use a boulder like that? If one only stands and looks is that better than one who walks on it? Or is just the fact that whatever we do on this land without destroying it, enough?

IMG_3813.JPG

Grinding rock

Even if there is no conscious appreciation by most of the people who daily walk and bike the trails or the weekend climbers or the campers or noon-time picnickers, they are choosing to do their activities in the shadow of Fortuna, of Fortune and Luck. I would think the climbers, especially, would be appreciative!

This morning I stood for a long while watching this mountain from the road. Besides the birds, I could hear ruffling in the bushes close to me, see streaks of reptile zip across sfortuna2.jpegthe small rocks and I saw how plants grow out of tiny cracks on a boulder’s surface. But I also found myself breathing deeply the scents of the outdoors, of bushes and flowers and leaves reminding me where I was at that moment.

A woman asked me what I was looking at. She had come up the road with her dog dragging her from side to side as he picked up scents. I pointed to the hawks and crows flying above and perching on top of the boulders. She seemed surprised at that, but not enough to stop and gaze for herself. No matter. She was enjoying her trail workout and happy to share it with her dog. A legitimate way to use and appreciate the place.

Aware or not, the Rock People watch. May we honor the memory of their people and their land.

 

IMG_2281

Rock People have families