Spring Fever?

 

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It often happens when I am struggling with something I really love, a pause helps me remember its joy. I didn’t consciously decide to take April off from posting on my blog, but a gut feeling of needing to focus elsewhere decided for me.

Spring has affected me in a funny way this year to the extent I just don’t want to be inside. And though I am reading a lot, I cannot seem to sit down to write up reviews. We had one of the rainiest winters on record and so many days were spent inside that I think I need to remind myself what a trail looks like and what sun on my skin feels like. I have taken lots of day trips, cooked more and visited with people I have missed. It’s been glorious…and shows me how unbalanced the last several months have been if I have let these things I also love, go.

But this morning I wanted to write, so I sat down to write up a blog post for Zola Addiction that will go up Tuesday. I also noticed a new Spin has been announced and even in the pausiest of pauses, who can resist a Classics Club Spin? These may be the only posts to go up this month, though. I am taking the need to step away seriously, but now with each passing day, the love of reading AND writing is building back up.

Anyone else struck with Spring Fever or something else that made you pause?

A few ways I have been spending my time this month:

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Historic house visiting.

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Day Trippin’ with a cute little companion.

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Meeting the funnest outdoor art.

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Lazy days of reading.

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At trip to Self-Realization Fellowship in Encinitas.

Mary Oliver, September 10, 1935 – January 17, 2019

When it’s over, I want to say: all my life
I was a bride married to amazement.
I was the bridegroom, talking the world into my arms.
When it’s over, I don’t want to wonder
If I have made of my life something particular, and real.
I don’t want to find myself sighing and frightened,
Or full of argument.
I don’t want to end up simply having visited this world. —from “When Death Comes”

 

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Mary Oliver died today.

Poet of nature, of spirituality; she loved all life.

Now she is with all of her beloveds…the two- and four-leggeds, the winged ones, the fishy furry slithery ones, the ones who grow tall from the forest floor their branches a shelter to the spidery predatory squirrelly ones.

Oliver’s death is an uncommon experience for me, since most of my favorite authors are classics writers and long dead! I don’t have to mourn the sudden silencing of their voice as I have to do now. But words live on and become more treasured than when uttered the first time. In 2017, I reviewed her latest collection of essays, called Upstream.

Looking for one of her works for this moment is impossible. There is never just one. So this:

Who made the world?
Who made the swan and the black bear?
Who made the grasshopper?
This grasshopper, I mean—
the one who has flung herself out of the grass,
the one who is eating sugar out of my hand,
who is moving her jaws back and forth instead of up and down—
who is gazing around with her enormous and complicated eyes.
Now she lifts her pale forearms and thoroughly washes her face.
Now she snaps her wings open, and floats away.
I don’t know exactly what a prayer is.
I do know how to pay attention, how to fall down
into the grass, how to kneel down in the grass,
how to be idle and blessed, how to stroll through the fields,
which is what I have been doing all day.
Tell me what else should I have done?
Doesn’t everything die at last, and too soon?
Tell me, what is it you plan to do
with your one wild and precious life? —“The Summer Day”

And this:

At Blackwater Pond the tossed waters have settled
after a night of rain.
I dip my cupped hands. I drink
a long time. It tastes
like stone, leaves, fire. It falls cold
into my body, waking the bones. I hear them
deep inside me whispering
oh what is that beautiful thing
that just happened?
—”At Blackwater Pond”

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Beginning Again…Happy 2019!

The words of this poem move me. I want to start this year with them in my heart. Life is simple and uncomplicated when I know what is most important is right in my own backyard.

I look up, I look down, in front and around. I look inside. And that is all I need to begin…I am another year old today.

 

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Me as Cormorant, open to all good things!

Remember

Remember the sky that you were born under, know each of the star’s stories.

Remember the moon, know who she is.

Remember the sun’s birth at dawn, that is the strongest point of time. Remember sundown and the giving away to night.

Remember your birth, how your mother struggled to give you form and breath. You are evidence of her life, and her mother’s, and hers.

Remember your father. He is your life, also. Remember the earth whose skin you are:
red earth, black earth, yellow earth, white earth
brown earth, we are earth.

Remember the plants, trees, animal life who all have their tribes, their families, their histories, too. Talk to them, listen to them. They are alive poems.

Remember the wind. Remember her voice. She knows the origin of this universe.

Remember you are all people and all people are you.

Remember you are this universe and this universe is you.

Remember all is in motion, is growing, is you.

Remember language comes from this.

Remember the dance language is, that life is.

Remember.

—Joy Harjo, 1951

It was a rough summer…..

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…..I didn’t think it would take this long to read and post again, but life threw some curve balls forcing me to take a break. I do intend to finish my Classics Club Spin, which I got 1/3 of the way through (Sir Walter Scott’s, Rob Roy) before things went south, and I hope to finish Persuasion and may attempt to write up why I did not like Pride and Prejudice. Yikes, I really did just say that!

I believe my health and other issues are now taken care of. I didn’t post anything for Banned Books Week, but I read through many of the books I own (The Diary of Anne Frank…really???) that have been challenged, and Instagrammed a few as well as some books I found at library sales. This is a stimulating week for me, it gets my ire up. I think it is important to see what classic and contemporary works were or continue to be under fire so we can support them. It is not up to some named or unnamed power to withhold knowledge or information from us or our children, because they think they know better. Only we can know for ourselves what is important to read and why.

I am gathering up my RIP choices for the month and will post those this week. I can’t think about scary books during September when it is still warm here and I am so physically active outside. Once the Equinox comes, the days cool off and it’s darker at night then I can feel the fear…..!!!!

I will continue to post for BTS* on the last Sunday of the month. Nature, through words and images, inspires me and heals me through every big and small thing. And today’s offering feels like a nice way back in.

I look forward to spending some time today seeing what you have all been up to!

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* as a way to share what is spiritually inspiring to me at the moment.

Update in the “Pause”

Thank you All for your good thoughts and optimism. My surgery is on Friday and I cannot wait to have my eyeball back in good working order!

With age-related cataracts, both eyes are usually done one after the other, but in my case only my right eye has a cataract. It will be interesting to see how this will effect my overall eyesight without glasses. At present, I don’t wear them to read. I won’t be fully recovered for a month.

At any rate, the books are piling up and calling my name!

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A Pause in Posting: The Eyes Have It!

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I spoke briefly about my adventures with skin cancer last Fall. Another fallout from growing up in Southern California and years of sun exposure–I am old enough to have spent many summers frying my skin because the words ‘sun block’ were not a product–is the development of a non age-related cataract in my right eye. These types are determined as such by the fact that the damage is on a different part of the lens. They are also fast growing. My eyesight began to change in April and by the end of May it was time to call the doctor.

I just had the appointment and I hope to have surgery next month. I was scared when this first began, but now I can’t wait to have it taken care of, because it has affected my ability to read. You may have noticed I am posting less; that’s because I read slower and, oh my, this is frustrating! I also find my laptop screen is sometimes blurry, which is why I am not commenting on your posts so much.

I am going to do myself a favor and take time off Relevant Obscurity until sometime in July. I don’t know what the recovery period is for cataract surgery…I won’t leave altogether, because hey, I am right in the middle of Persuasion (and liking it SO much better than Pride and Prejudice…oops, I did just say that, didn’t I?) and I know I will want to blog about it. I will continue to read slowly and do the best I can. And I know I’ll “Like” and pop up on your blogs if I can. Fortunately, I see very well off the page, so other parts of my life can continue as usual.

And may I just leave you with this: Wear sunscreen and a hat, as well as uv protecting sunglasses!

 

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I still go to the beach, but this is my attire now 🙂

I Downloaded the Babbel App for German, then Mark Twain put the Fear in Me!

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My philological studies have satisfied me that a gifted person ought to learn English (barring spelling and pronouncing) in thirty hours, French in thirty days, and German in thirty years. It seems manifest, then, that the latter tongue ought to be trimmed down and repaired. If it is to remain as it is, it ought to be gently and reverently set aside among the dead languages, for only the dead have time to learn it. Mark Twain, The Awful German Language

 

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In mid February I downloaded the Babbel app for German. Babbel is an online platform for learning a foreign language with fourteen languages to choose from.

I have no background in German, but became fascinated with it after months of watching a German tv show on YouTube and then to films on Netflix. It was something about the sound of the language that drew me and my curiosity lead me to explore online study.

Babbel has a microphone feature that allows you to repeat words for correct pronunciation which I find very useful. The lessons themselves are short and packed with relevant information and real world situations. Unlike language study in school (Spanish) where I had to keep up with the teacher’s schedule, with Babbel I set the pace, gliding along through what I catch onto easily and repeating concepts when necessary. I have become obsessed looking for words and phrases I can identify on German Instagram accounts and their comment section, I watch German YouTube travel videos and personal channels and I just taught my dog her first German command. I am having a blast!

Then I discovered The Awful German Language, an essay Mark Twain wrote about his own German language study while preparing for a trip to Germany in 1878. It is published as an appendix to his book, A Tramp Abroad.

Surely there is not another language that is so slipshod and systemless, and so slippery and elusive to the grasp. One is washed about in it, hither and thither, in the most helpless way; and when at last he thinks he has captured a rule which offers firm ground to take a rest on amid the general rage and turmoil of the ten parts of speech, he turns over the page and reads, “Let the pupil make careful note of the following exceptions.” He runs his eye down and finds that there are more exceptions to the rule than instances of it.

This is potentially intimidating. But I am not at the point where I am very concerned about grammar or the overall study of the language. I am just taking each lesson as it comes, conjugating regular verbs in the present tense and feeling pretty darned please with myself. This essay doesn’t create the right atmosphere for a new language learner and I considered putting it aside until I had a little more experience, but like a car wreck I could not NOT look at it!

…the same sound, sie, means you, and it means she, and it means her, and it means it, and it means they, and it means them. Think of the ragged poverty of a language which has to make one word do the work of six — and a poor little weak thing of only three letters at that. But mainly, think of the exasperation of never knowing which of these meanings the speaker is trying to convey. This explains why, whenever a person says sie to me, I generally try to kill him, if a stranger.

Ha!! I had just learned about sie/Sie when I read this! And I had to repeat this lesson several times before the concept sunk in. It IS confusing and perplexing, but seriously, Mr. Twain, it is not worth killing someone over.

However, while murder is not an option for me, I suppose everyone who studies a language has an Achilles heel of some kind and mine seems to be gendered nouns, which, if they don’t kill me, may render me impotent.

Every noun has a gender, and there is no sense or system in the distribution; so the gender of each must be learned separately and by heart. There is no other way. To do this one has to have a memory like a memorandum-book. In German, a young lady has no sex [mädchen or girl, is a neuter noun], while a turnip has. Think what overwrought reverence that shows for the turnip, and what callous disrespect for the girl. See how it looks in print — I translate this from a conversation in one of the best of the German Sunday-school books:

Gretchen: Wilhelm, where is the turnip?

Wilhelm: She has gone to the kitchen.

Gretchen: Where is the accomplished and beautiful English maiden?

Wilhelm: It has gone to the opera.”

After only two months of study Twain concludes his essay with 8 points of criticism with which he thinks the language should be reformed. Only Mark Twain would have such audacity.

As for me, I don’t yet know enough to be dismayed by cases or declensions (I push down deer-in-the-headlight memories of college Latin). I just know, “Ich bin Laurie” “Wo lebst du” und “Sprichst du Englisch” is a good beginning and will come in handy someday!

Tschüss! (Bye!)

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Found at a library sale: Lebendiger Bambus (The Living Reed in German), by Pearl S. Buck. To look forward to!